A good article starts with a good topic, and a good topic is what turns an average user into a reader. No matter how smart you think you are about grammar and punctuation, nobody would want to read your writing if it doesn’t show promise right from the start.

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Topics are similar to light bulbs. You need to switch them on for them to work. While you may write a catchy title, readers wouldn’t bother finish reading if they’re kept in the dark. Here are some questions to ask before writing your article:

Question #1: Has your topic been written a hundred—or even a thousand—times?

Go to Google or any major search engine and type what you want to write on the search box. How many results appeared? Did the first two to three pages all have the same thing? If the answer yes, go find another topic.

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If you’re going to write with that topic in mind, you’ll only clutter the web. In fact, you’re lucky if your article ever gets a chance to land on the first 10 pages of search engines. Be more specific and look for a different angle to lessen the competition.

Question #2: Will your readers find your topic interesting, relevant, and informational?

Keep in mind that the Internet can reach anybody around the world. While you’re targeting an American audience, there’s a possibility that your article will reach a British or even an Asian audience. Target the right audience by making interest and relevance work together. Many people don’t read until the end and that’s just sad, knowing that you spent time and effort writing your article.

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Read the latest news and incorporate it with your topic. Perhaps you want to write a generic topic, but if it has loads of new information, then you have an edge. Readers appreciate timely articles because it keeps them updated, especially on the things they care about and the actions they’re about to do—like home renovations or land buying.

Question #3: Do you have enough resources to write a convincing article about your topic?

Having reliable sources is what makes your article credible. You might think of a unique topic to write, but if you can’t find anything that supports it, you might not be able to present it well. This can make your article look biased, as if you’re beating around the bush with your own personal opinion.

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Resources don’t only help build and support an idea—your topic, it makes writing easier for you.

Don’t waste time writing an article that nobody will appreciate. Know if your topic is worth writing at all. Think of yourself as your target audience. Would you want to read that topic you want to write?